3DP Unlimited is offering an FFF 3D printer of epic proportions.

Truly, this is a production weapon Dirty Harry Callahan could love.Kong, thy name is 3DP1000.

3DP Unlimited is offering an FFF 3D printer of epic proportions. With a build envelope of 1 x 1 x .5 meters (3.3 x 3.3 x 1.64 feet), the print bed is 59 inches when measured diagonally. Truly, this is a production weapon Dirty Harry Callahan could love.

The resolution is adjustable, but it can print layers as fine as 70 microns. While most users wouldn't be looking for 70 micron detail from a print job that was eighteen inches tall and three feet wide, it isn't hard to imagine simultaneously printing a number of smaller parts that would otherwise require several normal-sized FFF printers to produce at once.

While most users wouldn't be looking for 70 micron detail from a print job that was eighteen inches tall and three feet wide, it isn't hard to imagine simultaneously printing a number of smaller parts that would otherwise require several normal-sized FFF printers to produce at once.

At first glance, the 3DP1000 might appear to be a standard Cartesian printer, albeit larger than most. But, it is based on industrial strength linear motion components, actuators and motors, and it is designed by engineers from PBC Linear, a company with considerable expertise in this area. It incorporates Constant Force™ lead screws with anti-backlash nuts for repeatable accuracy over the life of the system and utilizes integrated stepper motor amplifiers with micro-stepping up to 25,000 steps per revolution.

The 3DP1000 employs a heated borosilicate glass print bed, five millimeters thick.

The base model comes with the printer mounted on an industrial cart, an LED display with SD card reader and a filament spool rack with 1 kg of 3 mm PLA filament. Upgrade options include a better cart, dual extruders and the ability to work with higher temp materials. The unit's AC input can be upgraded to 220 volts for this purpose. The system's approximate weight is 300 lbs.

What is the price for being able to print a life-size human manikin in just two parts? The base model goes for $15,999.